Circle D Horses is home of some very nice broodmares & of Circle D Horse Marketing

 

Rare News

Multiple Graded

Stakes Performer

by First Down Dash

$43,758 Earnings

AAA Stakes & AQHA

Regional Champion Sire

 

 

 

VISIT OUR FRIENDS

 

 

FEATURED HORSE

Conquer This Wave

Sound, coming 3-yr-old son

of WORLD CHAMPION

WAVE CARVER out of

stakes producing mare

by ITS ROYAL TIME

 

FEATURED HORSE

TNT Tiny Dasher

Sound 2013 filly by

CHAMPION SEPARATIST

out of daughter of

CHAMPION HAWKINSON

SOLD HERE 2-7-16

 

FEATURED HORSE

Hez Rare

Yearling son of HEZ

CHOICE PROPERTY, si 96,

out of mare by

Champion RARE FORM

IN RACE TRAINING

 

FEATURED HORSE

Dashairess

Golden mare by multiple

graded stakes sire

DASHAIR, si 100, out of

stakes producing PROUDEST

EFFORT mare. She's in foal

to FIRST PRIZE STONE,

si 98, for a 2016 foal

PRICE REDUCED!

 

FEATURED HORSE

A Special First

AAA stakes winning / producing REAL RUNAWAY

mare in foal to stakes winner

CORONADO CARTEL, si 98,

for 2016. She's a sister

to All American Derby-G1

winner AREALSTRAITHEART

si 104, $910,338

 

FEATURED HORSE

"Birdie"

2015 filly by NF FRENCH

DISCO out of multiple race

winning AAA daughter

of STREAKIN LA JOLLA

 

FEATURED HORSE

The Sixy Side

AAA stakes placed winner

by THE DOWN SIDE,

half-sister to 3-time

Champion KETEL WON,

si 107, $651,740,

in foal to Champion

CARTERS CARTEL for 2016

 

FEATURED HORSE

Take Me To The Disco

2014 filly by NF FRENCH

DISCO BUG (Frenchmans

Guy x Disco Jerry TB)

 

FEATURED HORSE

Rightous Rock

2012 gelding by KAPUT TB

(son of Champion CAPOTE)

out of AAAT QH mare by STRAIGHT TALKER

from strong family.

Currently on the track!

 

 

 

HORSE ADS

From Years Gone By!

 

 

 

CIRCLE D

SUCCESS STORIES

News about the successes

of Rare News's

sons & daughters

& horses bred by

Circle D.

 

 

 

WIN PHOTOS

RARE NEWS'

SONS & DAUGHTERS

 

 

 

Look at the quality

 Rare News is siring!

Look at the quality

 Rare News is siring!

 

 

 

 

 

 


www.circledhorses.com

established 01/16/03

 

Currently averaging

more than

129,000 HITS

per day

 

Last Updated 12/10/2016

 

Web Design &

Maintenance By

 DINNELL

Circle D Horses LLC

©

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
From THE AMERICAN QUARTER HORSE RACING JOURNAL. June 2004
 

 

by Richard Chamberlain

Heart and 'tude, he had it all.

 
When Eye Yin You won the April 24 [2004] Remington Park Futurity (G1), the colt by Mr Eye Opener put Bully Bullion once again among the leading broodmare sires. And that again brings to the front the blood and heart of the horse, a Thoroughbred, that put the bull in Bully. Foaled in 1946, his name was Spotted Bull.

"Spotted Bull was brought o Arizona by Dink Parker and Ed Echols," recalls 82-year-old Art Pollard, who half a century ago was master of one of racing's top breeding programs. "Dink and Ed went back East to buy Spotted Bull when he was the national Thoroughbred spring champion about '49. He was by Bull Dog—I don't have to tell you anything about what a breeding dude he was—and out of a Man O'War mare named Spotted Beauty....He wasn't the Three Bars type of Thoroughbred, he wasn't the Quarter Horse type at all. Spotted Bull was a big horse, well-balanced and all that, but he was kind of a slab-sided horse. He wasn't as narrow as the Top Deck type, but he wasn't Quarter Horse, there wasn't much Quarter Horse conformation to him. He had a decent head, he was a classy-looking Thoroughbred, and he could run."

So could his offspring. Owned by a syndicate, Spotted Bull first stood at Melville Haskell's Rincon Stock Farm at Tucson. In a career cut way too short, Spotted Bull from nine crops sired only 44 starters, but 30 of them came back winners, including eight stakes winners led by champions Arizonan, Table Tennis and Panama Ace.

Spotted Bull wins at Rillito Park in 1950

There was a problem, a little bit of attitude. Well, a lot of 'tude. Spotted Bull, in Pollard's words, could be flat-out dangerous and had hurt several handlers. Walk into the stallion's paddock or stall, warned those who knew him best, and you'd be greeted by pinned ears, bared teeth and pawing front legs, or a quick whirl and both back hooves. But one of the worst incidents wasn't the horse's fault.

"Spotted Bull had a terrible reputation, some of it deservedly so," recalls Pollard. "Some articles came out with Spotted Bull savaging the owner. I was in the hospital with my back at the same time. and Mel and I were just two rooms apart. I hobbled in there and talked to him, and he was just furious because it came out in the Tucson papers that Spotted Bull had savaged Melville Haskell. the owner. The horse had nothing to do with it. Mel and a couple of other guys were out in the infield of the training track at Rincon Stock Farm, where Spotted Bull was turned out to exercise. Mel flood irrigated it—it was dry at the time—and there was a dike every 30-33 feet. Haskell's little dog was with them, and Spotted Bull playfully made a gallop at the little dog. The dog ran to Mel, and Mel didn't want Spotted Bull to brush him so he jumped out of the way, stumbled over a clod, fell against a hard dike and broke his hip. Spotted Bull didn't touch him, but nobody asked Mel or the two guys with him."

But that kind of word always gets around. A few years later, in 1956, the syndicate members decided to sell the horse. They thought they had a $20,000 deal with a stable in California, but the West Coast group backed out after hearing stories.

So Pollard offered $15,000 and took the stallion. After a rough start, and a physical discussion about who was in charge, the two got along fine.

"All Spotted Bull wanted—and most any stallion ever wants—is to be treated right, firmly but fairly and kindly," Pollard says. "And if they misbehave, they catch hell. Horses are smart, they catch on in a hurry."

Pollard stood Spotted Bull on his Lightning A Ranch at Tucson, along with his up-and-coming stallion Lightning Bar. Both were under the care of foreman Frankie Figueroa.

"My whole plan, for the long haul, was to cross Spotted Bull mares with Lightning Bar and Lighting Bar mares with Spotted Bull. I wouldn't have had to go anywhere, and I don't think many people would have outrun me as long as they lived."

It wasn't to be. Spotted Bull's attitude got him in trouble one last time.

"People were always coming by and taking movies of Spotted Bull," Pollard says, resigned to fate. "He'd run and play and put on quite a show. That's what they were doing while I was in town getting feed. He came down wrong and snapped his cannon bone, clean break, and before Frankie could get him stopped, he'd beat off two or three inches of bone. We put him down."

Spotted Bull was gone. Eye Yin You brings him back Again.

 


 

Circle D Horses | Great Horses Past & Present | Circle D Library

Circle D Broodmares | Horses For Sale | Rare News | Contact Us

 

 


 

 

Wilson kids on horseback, Drummond, MT, circa 1962

Bob and Sandy on Little Beaver, Phil and Teri on Penny

 

 

© Dinnell Circle D Horses, LLC